Fantastic Places, Unhuman Humans: 4 Lessons from TAing Online

For HASTAC: In spring 2017, I served as a teaching assistant for "Fantastic Places, Unhuman Humans," Brown's first ever online-only general education course in the humanities. In this gamified course, students follow a humanoid's curiosity about what it means to be human through the use of literary analysis. In addition to weekly readings, students completed cafes … Continue reading Fantastic Places, Unhuman Humans: 4 Lessons from TAing Online

Twitter Chat: Public Humanities and Public Scholarship

From HASTAC: Thursday, November 9, 2017 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm   1 pm Pacific/ 2 pm Mountain / 3pm Central / 4pm Eastern #HASTACpublic A @HASTACScholars chat moderated by @sheishistoric, @elbertscube, @FAlbrezzi, @bigdataJJ, @MichaelsLore, @kefaya1977 What does being a public scholar mean to you? In this chat, we hope to engage in discussion with students, … Continue reading Twitter Chat: Public Humanities and Public Scholarship

Learning to Extract & Understand Twitter Data

From HASTAC: I'm currently working on a research to document and explore the Twitter resistance movement that's formed in the wake of the Trump administration. In order to visualize, save, and explore the vast number of tweets that have appeared under various accounts and hashtags during this time, I decided to turn to Twarc. Developed … Continue reading Learning to Extract & Understand Twitter Data

Chapter 3: The Atlanta Compromise, Reacting to the Past

From HASTAC, as part of a collaborative review of Structuring Equality: In its efforts to center student learning, Finkel’s chapter argues that the “Reacting to the Past” (RTTP) game framework encourages student participation and reflection while engaging with history. Pioneered at Barnard College, RTTP pedagogy gives students control of the classroom, taking on assigned roles … Continue reading Chapter 3: The Atlanta Compromise, Reacting to the Past

HASTAC: Talking through NCPH 2017

From HASTAC: As a participant in the NCPH 2017 Working Group “Meeting in the Middle: Community Engagement in a Digital World,” ten public history practitioners and I are talking through the successes and struggles of web 2.0 projects. Seeing digital projects as places of shared authority, silence and exclusion, as well as part of the broader … Continue reading HASTAC: Talking through NCPH 2017